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Video Interview about Checkster

By Yves Lermusi

For those of you who are unclear about what Checkster is doing, check out the interview that Hyveup did on Checkster recently:

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Participate in our Survey

By Yves Lermusi

Make reference Checking a strong and powerful tool for your organization. Avoid legal pitfalls, save time, and benchmark your organization. To do this:

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Recruiting at Google in India

By Yves Lermusi

While in India recently, I had the opportunity to meet the head of Google India, Shailesh Rao. India is in an economic boom with a GDP growth of 9 percent (compared to 3 percent with the US) in an extremely competitive talent market. It is interesting to see how Google, one of the most innovative companies today, is addressing the talent challenge. In short, what can we learn from this smart and innovative company about how they address the talent challenge in a hyper growth market?

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WANTED: "Out-of-the-box talent management practices"

By Yves Lermusi

The latest report from the Economist Intelligence Unit clearly states: Tomorrow will be a struggle for a good workforce; It is a talent War!

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How to successfully look for a job - where are people looking?

By Yves Lermusi

If you are a job seeker, you’re probably wondering what works best for finding a job?
Here is a list of the top 3 things that lead to a successful job search:
1. Referrals (from current employees, friends, or customers of the employer)
2. Employer Website
3. Online Job database

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Reference Check Legal Solution

By Yves Lermusi

A good article titled, “The Rash Of Problems Over Job References,” published in the March 10 edition of the National Law Journal, discusses problems found in traditional reference checks. In short, it explains how employers are damned if they do, and damned if they don't.

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Neurological foundation of good performance feedback

By Yves Lermusi

Reinforcement Learning is a well accepted model in the computational community.
It was originally created by the artificial intelligence community as a model to understand and improve learning. The model’s core principle is based on a reward signal. Rewards in the animal world can be juice, food, or excitation of a pleasure zone in the brain. What we find fascinating is the fact that neuroscientists have been using Reinforcement Learning at the center of their model for understanding the brain, and it seems to be working!

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The Experience Trap

By Yves Lermusi

Often we see individuals trapped by their past experience. They want to change jobs but don’t have the “relevant” experience. Recruiters and managers don’t like taking risks and often prefer to hire someone who is not only a high performer, but also has relevant experience.

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Employment reference check questions: What can we learn?

By Yves Lermusi

Today, about 95 percent of companies perform reference checks. Reference checking is a current practice in the world of employment, but is often poorly performed. Not only is the process rushed and utilizes a limited amount of references, but recruiting and hiring managers don’t ask the right questions.

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Talent on Demand

By Yves Lermusi

Peter Cappelli is releasing his new book in a couple of weeks on the state of the talent management industry. He will be presenting a new model for talent that impacts organizations, employees, job seekers, coaches, counselors and anyone involved in the world of talent. We can already see his view in action in many organizations today.
Cappelli’s approach borrows from the principle of the supply chain and the manufacturing just-in-time revolution, but changes the language from an engineering certainty to a market-based approach with intrinsic uncertainty.

This new workplace dynamic revolves around 4 principles:
1. Make and buy talent: Internal talent development is still the preferred method as it is the cheapest and least disruptive for an organization. Yet, since the cost of unused inventory is a burden too heavy to carry, companies need to undershoot what their talent predictions are. Why undershoot? Because we have to accept the imprecise nature of talent forecasting.

2. Reduce uncertainty in Talent Demand: We have to accept the imprecise nature of talent prediction at its essence. Instead of going after the highly specialized developmental programs, we’re looking at providing training, tools, and framework that can apply to large employee populations and not small sections of your organization. We like this one, as it is exactly what Checkster is providing—a tool that helps all individuals grow!

3. Earn your ROI when you develop employees: Employees will have to share the cost of training, by either investing more of their personal time for training, or paying off the training investment if they leave. Note that new employers hiring employees could pick up the tab, making the reluctance or current training investment disappear. We like this one very much, as it is for the good of all parties!

4. Balance Employer/Employee interest: The internal job market within organizations places career management in the hands of employees. That’s one very efficient way to make a market-like approach to career evolution. Plus, it enables others to access a new realm of possibilities without being stopped by a rigid deterministic system. The only element that could stop us: our ability to produce results!

Order your copy of the book here.

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